OSI Report on TV in Europe: More Channels, Less Independence

TELEVISION ACROSS

EUROPE: MORE CHANNELS, LESS INDEPENDENCE

 

 

The Open Society Institute announces

the publication of a major new monitoring report on television in Europe. With an Overview chapter defining the main trends

across the region, as well as recommendations addressing policymakers, media and

activists, the report seeks to bring about change where it is

needed.

 

The report confirms that television,

which should be a pillar of democracy and open societies, is changing at

breakneck speed. Patterns of production, transmission, consumption, marketing,

financing and ownership - these are all in flux.  On the content side,

Europe is witnessing the rapid rise of program

formats and the slow suffocation of public service

output.


The report focuses on the latest

changes in nine countries: Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech

Republic, Italy, Lithuania, the Republic of Macedonia, Poland, Romania and Slovakia. These countries also

featured in the OSI's original Television across Europe project (2005), which covered 20 countries. The new

reports are sequels.

 

Key

findings:

* Public service broadcasters (PSBs)

suffer from mounting politicization and pressure, flawed funding models, and

disintegrating reputations.

* Broadcast regulators are also

increasingly politicised. Only a few have taken initiatives to let a more

diverse range of operators enter the market.

* Public service content has not

been boosted by incentives or obligations.

* Transparency of commercial media

ownership remains a major problem.

* Although debate on media policy

and reform has intensified, civil society is rarely consulted in a meaningful

way.

* There has been no concerted effort

to promote media literacy. Where this happens at all, it is carried out mainly

by NGOs.

 

The country reports and the regional

overview are available at www.mediapolicy.org . They are all

available in English while single country reports are also available in

translation. Printed copies are also available in limited numbers, and may be

ordered using the form available at www.eumap.org/puborder .

 

For further information, contact:

Mark Thompson

(Mark.Thompson@osf-eu.org) or Marius

Dragomir (Marius.Dragomir@osf-eu.org). To stay informed about

related reports and new content on the mediapolicy.org website, and to provide

your own feedback directly, please register on the website and subscribe to the

mailinglist: www.mediapolicy.org/join_form .

 

The report is a project of EUMAP, the EU Monitoring and Advocacy Program of the

Open Society Institute, and of the Media Program of the Open Society Foundation.

For further information on EUMAP see

www.eumap.org;

for further information on the Media Program see www.soros.org/initiatives/media .